The Living Situation: Kitchen Storage

Living Situation Kitchen StorageWhile we’re working on building our little farmhouse kitchen, I try to add pieces here and there that work in our kitchen now and still give that vintage farmhouse vibe. For me, the easiest way to do that is through storage. I got a set of three metal containers for flour, sugar and tea at a flea market, and have since added sealed glass containers for all of my baking stuff. These small pieces make the kitchen feel like my own and give it a clean yet cozy feel.

storage 1 storage 2Here are some other storage items that I hope to include soon:

Photo Credit: Alexandra Grablewski / Sweet Paul

Photo Credit: Alexandra Grablewski / Sweet Paul

Right now, I have a big jar holding all of my utensils. The only issue is that the mouth is not big enough to hold everything, so I keep the utensils I use daily in it, and then throw everything else in jar, where it all gets lost and if I’m not careful, smashed. I love the idea of organizing my utensils in different sized tin cans – something everyone has. You can find out more about this project by visiting Sweet Paul.

Photo Credit: Unsophisticook

Photo Credit: Unsophisticook

The “food prep” counter is getting cluttered with storing our fruit, veggies, bread, sweets and spices, and since we have basically zero space on our walls, all of the cute hanging spice racks I see just won’t work in our kitchen. I do, however, have a spare drawer that could easily fit our spices in. I love this idea from Unsophisticook of using baby food jars, chalk paint and a chalk pen to label each jar.

Photo Credit: Diana/ Our Vintage Home Love

Photo Credit: Diana/ Our Vintage Home Love

See that ladder pot rack? Yeah, that’s my dream right there. My aunt has a gorgeous metal pot rack that just happened to come with her house. Whatever. And every time I tell my boyfriend I need one, he just laughs it off. Because he seriously has zero time for any home projects. I get it. But this. This I could do on my own. You can see a tour of this beautiful kitchen from Our Vintage Home Love on Eclectically Vintage, you can find out how to build your own ladder on Our Vintage Home Love and if you already have a ladder, you can get the tutorial on Womans Day. Got it?

Photo Credit: Yvonne / The Yvestown Blog

Photo Credit: Yvonne / The Yvestown Blog

The one place I do have wall space is by our dining room table, and I have a cabinet that would be PERFECT there! Just need to make sure it’s something I can hang. I love how this cabinet from The Yvestown Blog is styled. I was just introduced to this blog from a roundup on Arcadian Home, and I just love it. She has so many beautiful DIY and knitting tutorials and it’s just a really gorgeous site to look at.

I can’t wait to start adding these items to our kitchen! What are your favorite kitchen storage staples? Share them in the comments and connect with me on Facebook, Twitter, InstagramGoogle + and Pinterest!

Thrifty Thursdays: A thrifty project

When we moved into our house, we upgraded Cecilia’s toy chest from a cardboard diaper box to a plastic tub. Since then, I have been pining for a wood toy chest for her, but felt defeated when every chest I liked was over $100. I didn’t want one that had a theme or was gender-specific, so that it could be used for many years and could be shared by our children.

The older toy chests were more expensive (obviously) and didn’t have the safety features they do now. Apparently that was the era of trial-and-error. So you can imagine my excitement when I found a toy chest for $22 at R 2nd Chance, a local thrift store, a few weeks ago. Since I donated a box of items, I got it for 30% off so I ended up getting it for only $16. Booyah! It has a soft close, and space so it won’t smash little baby fingers.

chestI took that bad boy home, cleaned it, sanded it and painted it. And then painted it again. And again. The best part is that the top is flat, so I decided to make that into a chalk board that she could create on. However, the chalk paint seeped through the painters tape a few times. Since I used spray paint on the rest of the toy chest, I would have to spray paint the parts that got the chalk paint on it and then that would get on the chalkboard, so I would have to repaint with chalk paint.

IMG_2753 photo 2 copyIt was a vicious cycle that I went through a few times until I came to terms that there would be little spills of chalk paint, and I’m hoping I can get that same color of spray paint in a little container of paint to touch up those spots. In the end, it will be in a toddler’s room and will probably get ruined after a couple days of use, anyway.

After everything, the toy chest cost was $16 plus about $10 in materials and about 6-8 hrs in labor. Next time, I would maybe use a different brush and less chalk paint on the edges so it won’t seep. Well worth the time in order to save $80-100. Plus, it’s way more special. I hope.

photo 3Have a fun thrifty project to share? Did you do this project and want to share photos? Post in the comments and connect with me on Facebook, Twitter, InstagramGoogle + and Pinterest!

Stay thrifty, my friends.

Hey I finished a project!

Yard sales are good for the soul, and for the house. I should have one every month. My mom is having one next week and I cleared out so much stuff that I was hoarding to prepare for the sale. Because of that, I found a bunch of fabric that I love and can’t wait to work with, and a lot of my old concert and band tees that I wanted to make a quilt with long, long ago. That dream is a little dead now…but I have a few ideas for what I want to do with them.

I also finally finished my chalkboard project, and actually baked something. I got an oatmeal cookie recipe from Sally’s Baking Addiction and they turned out so wonderful and moist! I substituted the raisins for blueberries since I was out of raisins, and while her recipe says to bake for 10 minutes, I had to bake for 15 since my oven is a little funky.

10538681_1389727607938469_1318935655_nSo, here’s how I made the chalkboard:

IMG_2497First, I took a simple frame I got from the thrift store for $1. Then I painted it with some acrylic paint that had been left in my car for wayyy too long. So, naturally that exploded everywhere. Luckily, I happen to buy a lot of teal paint so I had some back-up and after A LOT of cleaning, I was able to resurrect my project.

IMG_2555Since the frame had an indented line on it already, I used a gold paint pent to do the line and left one side blank to add some fancy stuff to it. Unfortunately, the paint pen was too thick and not I couldn’t simply wipe it when I made a mistake. So, I painted over it and chose to do a yellow line. The yellow ended up not working since it was so light and I had to paint multiple coats, which made it look thick and chunky…not the look I was going for.

IMG_2561So, after I cleaned that up a little…I found a sort of salmon pink that I liked, and covered the yellow with that. I chose to do little diamonds on the side I left blank. They are by no means perfect, but they will do!

IMG_2652While that was drying, I used a few coats of chalk paint to paint the backboard. And ta-da! It’s a chalkboard!

Have a project you want to share? Post in the comments and connect with me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google + and Pinterest!

Meet the Maker: Rosaura Unangst

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Photo by Carmen Salazar Photography

While many may view Instagram as simply a photo-sharing app (that is, after all, what it is), I love that I have actually made a handful of connections on there – whether it’s finding a new person through comments or through something of theirs that someone else has shared – and I love it even more when that person happens to live in my town.

Rosaura Unangst, 26, lives in Midtown in Sacramento and runs Pigment and Parchment, her hand lettering and watercolor business. She designs for weddings, graduations, babies and more. She also sells prints and holds watercolor and lettering workshops in her studio in Midtown and around California. I am so happy to be sharing just a little bit of her story today.

What inspired you to start hand lettering, when did you first get into it? I’ve hand lettered since pre-school! I dabbled a bit in graffiti style in high school (mainly due to a big crush I had on a very talented artist named Vlad) but I think when I was 19 and a sign artist at Trader Joe’s that’s the first time I really started upping my game.

What were some of your first lettering projects? The first I vividly remember was making a sign for a Sadie Hawkins dance in graffiti lettering. (Again- that art nerd crush I had)
What pushed you to start your workshops, and what have you learned from them so far? I have done informal ones with family and friends for years and I was looking for a way to incorporate engaging with the community with my art business. It was a natural fit and is so much healthier for me (creating tends to be very isolating & as much as I like solitude I don’t want to become a total recluse). I’ve learned how therapeutic and universal creating is. I’ve always known this to be true for myself but after hearing countless people say how relaxing it is as they leave my workshop I’m on a one woman mission to get this message out there to everyone.
How much time do you spend on creating vs workshops vs businessy stuff? It really depends. There has to be balance between both which can be hard because I only want to create and host workshops but half the time I do have to promote, set up listings and websites, deal with printing and other businessy stuff. A goal of mine is to get an art agent so they can deal with that & I can focus more on making!
P&P Workshop

Photo by Lacey M. Carroll

How do you best manage everything with your caretaking job and personal life? There’s no perfect balance. That’s a myth. It’s all a work in progress and correcting when any one thing is taking over too much time. In the past year or so I’ve been a lot kinder to myself and allowed myself to accept I can’t do it all and that’s ok. Instead I focus on what I have accomplished and that leaves me feeling more empowered to haul ass again the next day!

Favorite place you’ve hosted a workshop so far? My in-laws’ patio overlooking Hermosa Beach. Life doesn’t get any better than when you can smell salt in the air.
What does your studio look like right now? A bit messy always but there is order in the chaos- not that anyone else would know it but I’ve got a visual memory and know exactly where everything is. It’s a lot better in our current home than ever before because I’ve got a swivel door that used to be a Murphy hideaway bed in the 40s and now houses all my crafting stuff and props. There’s a vintage bar cart with more of my fine art supplies, a rolling desk that doubles as a mini photo studio, a long desk for the computer, giant scanner & giant printer, a bookcase with all my reference art books & my cat Elphaba’s corner of shame (her litter box complete with styled cat supplies).
What do you think was one of the best business moves you made to get you to where you are today? I wouldn’t call it a business move but it’s definitely gotten me where I am today… going to a clinic and getting help with an eating disorder last year. Therapy taught me about living in the present, confidence, self worth, creating a life I choose and so much more. There is a reason my past art businesses and ventures weren’t as successful in the past and I think my personal life and issues were absolutely holding me back. Learning to take care of myself has not only done wonders for my personal life but it has everything to do with how I put myself out there as an artist today.
How do you motivate yourself every morning? Hm… Jasmine tea or fresh ground drip coffee. In truth- every morning I wake up to likes, comments and new followers on Instagram and though I don’t need validation from that I also can’t say it isn’t motivation to get moving on creating more awesome stuff. It’s really the comments every once in a while from a person really touched or inspired by my artwork that gives me enough motivation for a week. 
P&P art

Photo by Lacey M. Carroll

What do you do if you need to unwind? I mindfully do dishes (warm water & I splurge on the good smelling soap from Method), errands (surprising but they get me out of the house and walking around while not completely taking a break from life- two birds one stone!), play board games & go watch art house films with my husband Nathan.

Who are your biggest inspirations? My contemporaries- Katie Daisy, Lisa Congdon, Emily McDowell, Anna Rifle Bond & Molly Jaques. Talk about a power house of kick ass women. Earlier Inspiration- Frida Kahlo, Judy Garland, Vincent Van Gogh, Mid Century Design, Old Musicals

Favorite books on creative lettering? The bible is Creative Lettering by Jenny Doh (which I’m contributing to the sequel!! EEK!) Modern Calligraphy is a good resource too. I’ve got a few others but honestly just absorbing lettering from back when all advertising was done without the use of computers is where a lot of inspiration of creative lettering comes from.

Best/scariest thing about running your own creative business? The best part is I know I’m doing the thing that I’m best at. I am contributing to culture. Art is connecting to humanity on a level that strips away all the bullshit. The scariest part used to be not being seen as having a real job by lots of people- but now that I’ve made my peace with that I’d say the scary part is probably dealing with all the businessy stuff. I am learning, I am figuring it out slowly but surely but it doesn’t come naturally to me

Favorite thing about what you do? There is a certain pride and joy when you make something from nothing. To sum up & show off my musicals nerdiness- “The opposite of war isn’t peace. It’s creation.” (Johnathan Larson- Rent) Art connects you to other humans on a level nothing else can reach.

What has been one of your favorite projects/commissions that you have worked on? Oh that’s a tough one. A full room Peter Pan mural always had a special place in my heart. I’ve always encouraged people to never grow up.

suitcase

Photo from Rosaura Unangst

Best business advice you’ve received? Be yourself. Be authentic. Cuss if you want to. (Thanks Carmen & Dena!)

What kind of projects do you hope to work on next? Custom wedding suites that really tell the story of the couple. I’d love to do some more murals- it’s been a while but it’s like riding a bike. I’m bringing back the funky portraits I used to do- some of those would be fun!

Dream place to host a workshop? India. I’d want to cohost and start with someone teaching us the process of learning about pigment and making dyes and paint, then end with using the paint and/or dyes we just made to create art! Essentially the ‘farm to fork’ version of a workshop.

What advice do you have for people who are just starting their creative businesses? Be careful with spending a lot of time looking at what other people are creating. Of course you have to a bit to get a feel for what people are buying, charging and what’s already out there so you’re not offering the exact same thing. BUT! If you feel yourself being too influenced by other people’s styles or tastes and that starts to overpower your own aesthetic it’s time to unplug the computer and get back to your roots and your own eye. You’ll never please everyone. Own it. The people who like your style will like you that much more for not being the same as the mainstream offering.

thankyou

Photo from Rosaura Unangst

You can find out more about Rosaura Unangst and Pigment and Parchment by visiting her website, where she has a schedule of her workshops, links to her social media accounts (like her super cool Instagram) and details on her design services and pricing. She has printables for sale in her Etsy shop and her next workshops are in Santa Cruz on the 26th. There will also be a hand lettering workshop in Sacramento on the 31st.

I have a few spots open for Meet the Maker profiles this year so if you know someone who should be featured, let me know in the comments and connect with me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google + and Pinterest! Keep on creating!

Crafting and the art of taking it slow

My attention span has always been incredibly short. If something wasn’t completed in the first few hours of me working on it, it was done. Tossed aside and never to be looked at again, unless by happenstance. So many cute sewing projects, paintings and DIY projects are still unfinished and in storage bins that I don’t have the courage (aka patience) to dig through.

Motherhood has taught me to handle things a little differently. My attention span is still small, as I will find half-finished piles of laundry and a sink full of half-washed dishes from time to time, but now I have an excuse. My daughter is constantly pulling at me and if you saw her face, you would pick her up, too.

IMG_2497I made a plan to work on my art projects while she was sleeping, which is about two hours a day, give or take. Sometimes I trade in art time for a nap, for cleaning time or to just veg out on the couch. A couple weeks ago, I finally decided to go into my bin of projects I have yet to start – mainly because it will be less to move when I have to relocate my little workspace – and found a frame I wanted to paint.

IMG_2499The first day, I worked on the first coat. I was reminded that I left my paint in the car for too long the other day, because it was super liquidy and made a huge mess. So I spent the majority of my two hours cleaning paint off every inch of my table and trying to thicken it up a little. After I finally surrendered to another color, I was able to finish the first coat before she woke up.

That night, the shelf above my table came crashing down, spilled my paint cup all over the place and ruined two projects I previously worked on. That taught me to not leave finished projects lying around, but to actually do what I intended to do with them. Now I have zero proof that I finished a project.

IMG_2555Throughout the week, I was able to put a couple more coats on, and finally got it ready for the detailing. I tried to do it all with my paint pen so that I wouldn’t have to waste time getting all my paint stuff together and could do it while Cecilia was watching cartoons, but it turns out that my pen is too thick for the thin line I want to paint.

I’m slowly learning that it’s OK to give myself time to work on something. I enjoy having a project to work on every day, and it gives me time to think about different ideas for my piece. I still need to paint the backboard with my chalk paint, and then I’ll hang it up in either my workspace or Cecilia’s room. And then it will be on to the next unfinished project!

IMG_2561

I’m leaving one side undone until I figure out what I want to do with it. My attention span is not that bad :)

IMG_2562What projects are you working on? Do you give yourself a couple hours a day to work on it or do you get it all done in the first shot? Share in the comments and connect with me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google + and Pinterest!

Maternity Style Inspiration

Maternity Style InspirationThe other day I was folding my clean laundry and I started chuckling because I realized that my PJs and yoga pants were slowly starting to overtake my life again. And since the majority of my maternity clothes that have already reappeared in my closet are more suited for the fall, I am determined to add some Summer style to my wardrobe.

After spending a small fortune on maternity clothes last year – only to learn that they would not be in the cycle for long – I refuse to make that same mistake again. I’ve found some DIY maternity clothing tutorials, used maternity clothes and some easy and cheap accessories that should make the transition simple and cheap. Just my style.

Of course, my first stop was Pinterest. Where I found this beauty from A Beautiful Mess, one of my favorite sites for DIY and design inspiration.

Photo from A Beautiful Mess

Photo from A Beautiful Mess

This DIY Maternity Wrap Dress is freaking adorable, and since it doesn’t require me to use a sewing machine, it looks pretty simple! You just need four yards of fabric and the entire tutorial with photos is in the post.

It was also through Pinterest that I found my newest obsession – Cotton and Curls. She shares A LOT of DIY clothing tutorials, and even has a maternity section! Her posts make even the very beginners of seamstresses (hi, me) feel like they could actually make this stuff.

Photo from Cotton & Curls

Photo from Cotton & Curls

It was actually hard for me to pick just one post that I wanted to feature, but I just fell in love with this DIY Very gathered A-Line skirt when I saw it. The fabric is from Sarah Jane, and the entire tutorial with photos is in the post. She also noted that with the elastic and gathering, this skirt is not limited to maternity.

Photo from ThredUp

Photo from ThredUp

And if you don’t feel like making your own stuff (I get it), ThredUp has some pretty cute used maternity clothes, like this casual skirt from Motherhood, which retails for $27, but is selling for $8.49. I always get a little anxious about buying clothes online because I don’t know how they fit, but since I’ve worn Motherhood before, I feel comfortable with their sizes.

Photo from Prudent Baby

Photo from Prudent Baby

And if you were wondering what to do with your tights since your pregnant self is not going to fit into them during this hot season, turn them into head wraps, like the ladies of Prudent Baby showed on the YouTube Channel, The Mom’s View! I’m not a tights fan to begin with, but I could certainly get some cheap pairs for this project! You can find more head wrap inspiration on Honestly, WTF – another awesome site I landed on today.

If you are also expecting, how are you styling your cute lil pregnant self this summer? Share any inspiration, tips and DIY tutorials in the comments and connect with me on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Google + and Pinterest!